Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/32005

The Effect Of Chloroquine And Pyrimethamine On The Growth Of Two Strains Of The Human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium Falciparum, After Long-Term Continuous In Vitro Cultivation

File SizeFormat 
Campbell_Lori.PDF1.4 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: The Effect Of Chloroquine And Pyrimethamine On The Growth Of Two Strains Of The Human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium Falciparum, After Long-Term Continuous In Vitro Cultivation
Authors: Campbell, Lori
Advisor: Siddiqui, Wasim
Issue Date: 15 Jan 2014
Publisher: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract: Two strains of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were maintained in Aotus trivirgatus by serial passages, subsequently cultured continuously¬∑in-vitro, and then tested to determine their susceptibility to two antimalarial drugs, chloroquine and pyrimethamine. The Uganda-Palo Alto (FUP) strain, susceptible to chloroquine and resistant to pyrimethamine when maintained in-vivo, was found to be more susceptible to chloroquine and susceptible to pyrimethamine after continuous in-vitro cultivation for 652 days. The Vietnam-Oak Knoll (FVO) strain, resistant to chloroquine and susceptible to pyrimethamine when maintained in-vivo, was found to be susceptible to chloroquine and more susceptible to pyrimethamine after continuous in-vitro cultivation for 297 days. It was also found that after continuous in-vitro cultivation, the FUP and FVO strains showed similar sensitivities to comparable concentrations of both chloroquine and pyrimethamine, whereas prior to long term in-vitro cultivation, their responses to these two drugs were distinct.
Pages/Duration: 24 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/32005
Rights: All UHM Honors Projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Honors Projects for Biology



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.