Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/31799

The Why of Model Rocketry with a How to Build a Scratch Rocket Manual and Historical Timeline included: Pedagogical approaches for gender, racially, and culturally diverse ninth grade science classrooms that employ project-based instruction.

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Title: The Why of Model Rocketry with a How to Build a Scratch Rocket Manual and Historical Timeline included: Pedagogical approaches for gender, racially, and culturally diverse ninth grade science classrooms that employ project-based instruction.
Authors: Maddox, Conred
Issue Date: 15 Jan 2014
Publisher: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract: Why model rocketry? After completing a semester of college level physics, participating at the Lucerne Lake National Association of Rocketry convention, and acquiring a level 2 model rocketry certification with Dr. Jacob Hudson, my mentor in the sciences, I became convinced that rocketry is a useful tool for introducing scientific concepts to high school students. I have since edited and updated a model rocket guide comprised of photocopies from various science texts compiled by Mr. Dan Nelson, a teacher at St. Andrew's Priory. Using the guide as my starting point, I put together my own version: How to Build a Model Rocket from Scratch manual. Shortly after, I had an opportunity to oversee a teacher's day at the NASA Aerospace Education Lab (at Oahu's Windward Community College), where I was showing the visiting teachers how to operate the various aeronautical work stations. On a whim, I asked Ms. Lynette Low-a science teacher at Kaimuki High School-if she would be interested in using my manual as a supplement to her daily science instruction. Before I knew it, I was standing in front of her five large classes filled with students' faces representing many of the various races and cultures that reside in the Aloha State of Hawai'i, all staring up at me with both curiosity and skepticism. Ms. Low spent the first five minutes of class telling the students to tum off their various electronic devices (yes, even in a low income school, the students carry mp3 and CD players, handheld video games, and the ever present cellular phone). I stood there with a six foot rocket hoping the prospect of a rocket launch would hold these students' attention long enough for them to learn some science.
Pages/Duration: 103 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/31799
Rights: All UHM Honors Projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Honors Projects for English



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