Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/31613

The Effects of Ability Grouping on Achievement A review of Twenty Studies Published After 1960

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Title: The Effects of Ability Grouping on Achievement A review of Twenty Studies Published After 1960
Authors: Yang, Judy
Issue Date: 15 Jan 2014
Publisher: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract: Homogeneous grouping is “the classification of pupils for the purpose of forming instructional groups having a relatively high degree of similarity in regard to certain factors that affect learning.”1 More specifically, ability grouping refers to the grouping of students for instruction, usually on the basis of achievement as measured by standardized tests. Other criteria often include: age, intelligence quotient, teacher recommendations, etc., depending on the particular school. The most common grouping levels are “superior,” “average,” and “slow.” In contrast, heterogeneous grouping or random grouping refers to the grouping of students according to age and such that a wide range of ability is represented in the classroom. Heterogeneous grouping is often proposed as an alternative to ability grouping, and the superiority of either method of organization has been often debated by educators. Comparisons of the two methods have also been the subject of research studies for more than forty years.
Pages/Duration: i, 53 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/31613
Rights: All UHM Honors Projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Honors Projects for Education



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