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The Dream of Joseph: Practices of Identity in Pacific Art

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Item Summary

Title: The Dream of Joseph: Practices of Identity in Pacific Art
Authors: Thomas, Nicholas
Keywords: art
identity
Polynesia
LC Subject Headings: Oceania -- Periodicals.
Issue Date: 1996
Publisher: University of Hawai’i Press
Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Citation: Thomas, N. 1996. The Dream of Joseph: Practices of Identity in Pacific Art. The Contemporary Pacific 8 (2): 291-317.
Abstract: This essay explores presentations of identity in two recent exhibitions of Polynesian
art. The first and more widely celebrated of these, Te Maori, emphasized
traditional artworks; the second, consisting of work by migrant Polynesians, presented
contemporary culture and identity in more mobile and fluid terms. The
idea that personal identity is formed by cultural background and tradition nevertheless
remains dominant in individual artists’ discussions of their concerns and
motivations.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/2998
ISSN: 1043-898X
Appears in Collections:TCP [The Contemporary Pacific], 1996 - Volume 8, Number 2



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