Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/29616

Remembering Hawaii Statehood in Hawaii's English-Language Newspapers: How Biased Newspaper Coverage Affects Historical Narrative Creation

Item Summary

Title: Remembering Hawaii Statehood in Hawaii's English-Language Newspapers: How Biased Newspaper Coverage Affects Historical Narrative Creation
Authors: Deguzman, Maria
Instructor: Kim, Jang
Issue Date: 03 Dec 2011
Publisher: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract: The overthrow of the Hawaiian Monarchy in 1893 set off a series of events that ultimately resulted in Hawai’i becoming known as the 50th state of the United States. One of the last of these events was a referendum, a vote by residents of Hawai’i, on the Hawaii Admission Act that was signed into law by President Eisenhower in 1959. Given only the choice of accepting the act and becoming a state, or rejecting it and remaining a territory, an overwhelming majority voted in favor of the act. Over 50 years later, Hawaii Statehood remains controversial due to a belief that Hawai’i never legally became a state and that it has been illegally occupied by the United States since 1898. Although there is a consensus among scholars that the two main English-language newspapers in Hawai’i were biased in favor of Hawaii Statehood, there is little scholarship on how this media bias affects the public memory of this event.
Pages/Duration: 124 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/29616
Rights: All UHM Honors Projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Honors Projects for Communication



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