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An Examination of the Relationship between Television Watching, Internet Usage, and the Frequency of Fast Food Consumption by Students at the University of Hawaii at Ma?noa

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Title: An Examination of the Relationship between Television Watching, Internet Usage, and the Frequency of Fast Food Consumption by Students at the University of Hawaii at Ma?noa
Authors: Daoust, Katlyn
Instructor: Wu, Sandra
Issue Date: 08 Dec 2011
Publisher: University of Hawaii at Manoa
Abstract: The following study examined the relationship between the amount of time that college students spend watching television and using the Internet with the amount of fast food that they consume. Relevant literature provides support for the argument that fast food companies in particular have recognized television and the Internet as the most successful means to reaching consumers (Semmler, 2007 & Lenhar, Purcell, Smith, & Zickhur, 2010). The transitional nature of college increases students’ susceptibility to fast food advertising strategies because of the amount of time they spend engaging in television watching and Internet usage (Knutson, 2000). A total of 315 University of Hawaii at Manoa undergraduate students participated in this study. Results of this study found that the amount of internet usage on a weekly basis exceeds that of television watching as 79.4% (n=250) or participants used the internet for three hours or more during the weekdays and 87.9% (n=277) used the internet for two hours or more during the weekends. On average, 94% (n=297) consumed fast food at least once a week, while 61.3% (n=193) ate fast food between one and three times a week. Additionally, a relationship was found between the amounts of time spent watching television and using the internet, and consuming fast food. However, this relationship is weak and therefore indicates that there may be factors other than amounts of television and internet usage influencing participants to consume fast food.
Pages/Duration: 133 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/29614
Rights: All UHM Honors Projects are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Honors Projects for Communication



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