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Forest bird inventory of the Kahuku unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park

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Title: Forest bird inventory of the Kahuku unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park
Authors: Tweed, Erik
Gorresen, P Marcos
Camp, Richard J.
Hart, Patrick J.
Pratt, Thane K.
LC Subject Headings: Birds -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Bird surveys -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Hawaii)
Issue Date: May 2007
Publisher: Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: Tweed E, Gorresen PM, Camp RJ, Hart PJ, Pratt TK. 2007. Forest bird inventory of the Kahuku unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Honolulu (HI): Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 143. 55 pages
Series/Report no.: Technical Report
143
Abstract: The Kahuku Unit of the Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) was surveyed for native and non-native birds from January to September of 2005. Bird habitat comprised of forest, woodland, and grassland was divided into five separate regions, and these were surveyed with variable circular plot count methodology to generate estimates of abundance and occurrence. Sampling coverage was more intensive (i.e. several times more count transects and stations) than in past surveys, for more accurate estimates of range and population size. In addition to point counts, we recorded incidental observations to supplement the survey. Ten native and 14 non-native bird species were detected within the region. The most abundant and widespread native forest birds observed were the `Ōma`o (Myadestes obscurus), Hawai`i `Amakihi (Hemignathus virens virens), `I`iwi (Vestiaria coccinea), and `Apapane (Himatione sanguinea sanguinea). The second largest populations of three endangered forest bird species in Hawai`i—`Akiapōlā`au (Hemignathus munroi), Hawai`i `Ākepa (Loxops coccineus), and Hawai`i Creeper (Oreomystis mana)—were centered in the Ka`ū Forest Reserve and extended into the Kahuku Unit. The detections within the boundaries of the unit now add these endangered species to HAVO. The Hawai`i `Elepaio (Chasiempis sandwichensis) shows evidence of a regional population decline. The two native species that use habitat other than forest—Hawaiian Hawk (Buteo solitarius) and Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva)—were rarely detected in the study areas. The Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) and Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) were the mostabundant non-native species. The remaining non-native species were uncommon to rare and were restricted to either the dry leeward or wetter windward sides of the Kahuku Unit.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: This project was carried out under a cooperative agreement between the National Park Service, Pacific Island Network and the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa (No. H8080040012, task agreement No. J8080040035).
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/29483
Appears in Collections:The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current



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