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Inventory and monitoring of seabirds in National Park of American Samoa

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Title: Inventory and monitoring of seabirds in National Park of American Samoa
Authors: O’Connor, Paul J.
Rauzon, Mark J.
LC Subject Headings: Sea birds -- American Samoa.
Bird surveys -- American Samoa.
National Park of American Samoa (American Samoa)
Tutuila Island (American Samoa)
Issue Date: Oct 2004
Publisher: Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: O'Conner PJ, Rauzon MJ. 2004. Inventory and monitoring of seabirds in National Park of American Samoa. Honolulu (HI): Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 136. 140 pages
Series/Report no.: Technical Report
136
Abstract: This first island-wide inventory and preliminary monitoring of American Samoa seabird populations has produced several significant results. The beginning of a seabird colony catalog has been established in a digital format. The protocol for surveying seabirds around Tutuila Island by boat is described, and future efforts can be compared to baseline results reported here. A detailed survey of the National Park lands around Tutuila is mapped and photographed and seabird distributions found in the 2000 round-island survey and 2003 partial-island survey are discussed. Our results support anecdotal evidence that the inaccessible north shore of Tutuila supports the majority of that island’s resident seabirds. Greater than 90% of Red-footed Boobies and Great Frigatebird observations during the Tutuila round-island survey were made in NPSA areas. The north shore areas are important for coastal cliff nesters such as Brown, Black Noddies and Blue Noddies, a species of international significance. Bridled Terns are extending their pan tropical range to include Tutuila, including Park areas. White Terns and White-tailed Tropicbirds are more evenly distributed across forests in Tutuila within as well as outside NPSA areas.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: National Park Service Contract No. 8036 2 9004
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/29482
Appears in Collections:The PCSU and HPI-CESU Technical Reports 1974 - current



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