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Title: The lands of Hina: an archaeological overview and assessment of Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Moloka'i 
Author: McCoy, Mark D
Date: 2005
Publisher: Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany
Citation: McCoy MD. 2005. The lands of Hina: an archaeological overview and assessment of Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Moloka'i. Honolulu (HI): Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Botany. PCSU Technical Report, 135.
Abstract: This overview and assessment report focuses on previous, current, and proposed archaeological research in the Kalaupapa National Historical Park(NHP)on Moloka'i Island, Hawai'i. The park is the home of the historical Kalawao (A.D. 1866-1900) and Kalaupapa (A.D. 1900-present) settlements for
people with leprosy, or Hansen's disease as its known today. The report centers on projects dealing with the substantial archaeological record preserved in the park dating to the early historic (A.D. 1866-1778) and prehistoric (A.D. 1778-1200) eras. The goal of the report is to provide park managers and others a succinct summary of previous and current archaeological research, an assessment of the results, and recommendations for additional research and management.

Kalaupapa NHP has a history of archaeology dominated by surveys. An estimated 6.4 % of the park has been intensively surveyed (690 acres/279.5ha) with an additional 7.6 % surveyed at the reconnaissance level (820 acres/332 ha). A total of 616 sites have been recorded, some including hundreds of small features. Overall site density is high and the state of preservation of sites is excellent. There is extensive evidence of modification of the landscape for agriculture during the prehistoric and historic eras. Kaupikiawa Cave (50-60-03-312) has been of particular interest to archaeologists due to what the deposits inside may tell us about the prehistoric era. Archaeological excavations have been rare; however, current evidence suggests a continuous record of human occupation for the past 800 years. Permanent settlements may have been first established in the Waikolu Valley and somewhat later on the Kalaupapa Peninsula and other parts
of the park.

The results of past archaeological projects are synthesized in the text and presented in detail in Appendix I. Most projects reviewed have been instigated and funded by the National Park Service (NPS). Other projects such as historic resource studies, archival research, and natural resources studies are also discussed since they have the potential to provide important supporting, independent lines of evidence to interpret the archaeological record. Recent academic research on the historic era at Kalaupapa is reviewed.
Series/Report No.: Technical Report
135
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/2931
LC Subject Headings: Archaeological surveying -- Hawaii -- Molokai.
Kalaupapa (Hawaii) -- Antiquities.
Kalaupapa National Historical Park (Hawaii)

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