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WRRCTMR No.57 Pathogenic Enteric Viruses in the Hawaiian Ocean Environment: Viability and Die-Off

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Title: WRRCTMR No.57 Pathogenic Enteric Viruses in the Hawaiian Ocean Environment: Viability and Die-Off
Authors: Lau, L. Stephen
Loh, Philip C.
Fujioka, Roger S.
LC Subject Headings: Enteroviruses -- Pathogenicity
Marine pollution -- Hawaii -- Measurement.
Sewage disposal in the ocean -- Hawaii -- Oahu.
Issue Date: Apr 1977
Publisher: Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Citation: Lau LS, Loh PC, Fujioka RS. 1977. Pathogenic enteric viruses in the Hawaiian ocean environment: viability and die-off. Honolulu (HI): Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa. WRRC technical memorandum report, 57.
Series/Report no.: WRRC Technical Memorandum Report
57
Abstract: Human enteric viruses were recovered from 0.19 to 0.76 m^3 samples obtained from various natural marine water sites using the portable virus concentrator (Aquella). The concentration and frequency of viruses and
coliform bacteria were highest within the sewage plume over the ocean discharge pipe and proportionately decreased as the sample distance from the plume was increased. Viruses were recovered at a maximum distance
of 3 218 m from the plume but never from a station 6 436 m from the plume. However, since the same type of sewage-borne viruses were also recovered from boat marinas and from a stream entering the ocean, the
sewage ocean outfall may not be the only source of viruses entering the ocean. Significantly, viruses were occasionally recovered from samples which were negative for coliform bacteria.
The expected stability of human enteric viruses in the marine waters was determined to be approximately 48 hours using type 1 poliovirus as the model virus. All marine waters obtained from various sites off the coast of Hawaii were determined to be virucidal and evidence was obtained that marine microorganisms are the natural virucidal agents in these waters.
Sponsor: University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program under Institutional Grant Nos. 04-6-158-44026 and 04-6-158-4414 from NOAA Office of Sea Grant, Department of Commerce; the Department of Public Works, City and County of Honolulu; and the Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii
Pages/Duration: v + 22 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/2818
Appears in Collections:WRRC Technical Memorandum Reports



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