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Effects of microclimatic changes on oogenesis of Drosophila mimica

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Title: Effects of microclimatic changes on oogenesis of Drosophila mimica
Authors: Kambysellis, Michael P.
Keywords: Drosophila mimica
LC Subject Headings: Bioclimatology -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Drosophila -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Issue Date: May 1974
Publisher: Island Ecosystems IRP, U.S. International Biological Program
Citation: Kambysellis MP. 1974. Effects of microclimatic changes on oogenesis of Drosophila mimica. Honolulu (HI): Island Ecosystems IRP, U.S. International Biological Program. International Biological Program Technical Report, 39. 58 pages.
Series/Report no.: International Biological Program Technical Report
Abstract: The reproductive mode of Drosophila mimica, a species endemic to the island of Hawaii, was determined by analyzing the ovarian development of three natural populations during a nine month period. Qualitatively the developmental profile of the ovaries remained the same in all the populations and for the entire collecting period. Each developmental stage was represented only in a fraction of the ovarioles, and mature eggs were usually found in half of the ovarioles. Quantitative differences were found between populations and between collections and these differences were correlated with the environmental conditions. The relative humidity was found to be the most important factor in regulating ovarian development by interrupting the growth of oocytes at the stage of RNA-yolk synthesis. A seven day period of constant low relative humidity causes the degeneration of grown oocytes, while a constant high humidity for the same period of time reinitiates normal development. This mechanism serves as a device to assure the presence of not more than one mature egg per ovariole, and thus prevents the overpopulation of the natural breeding substrates after environmental stresses. The adaptive significance and the theoretical implications of such behavior were discussed.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Sponsor: It is my pleasure to express my deepest gratitude to Professors D. Elmo Hardy and Hampton L. Carson for supporting, organizing and providing laboratory facilities at the University of Hawaii where this work was carried out. I am in debt to Dr. Garrett A. Smathers for accumulating the meteorological data, to Mr. Ken Kaneshiro for his assistance in specimen identification and to Mr. A. Kuniyuki for technical assistance. The hospitality and cooperation from the administration of the Headquarters of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park was much appreciated. I am also grateful to Professor William B. Heed for his stimulating discussions during the progress of this work.
Pages/Duration: 58 pages
Rights: CC0 1.0 Universal
Appears in Collections:International Biological Program Technical Reports (1970-1975)

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