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The roles of fungi in Hawaiian island ecosystems I. Fungal communities associated with leaf surfaces of three endemic vascular plants in Kilauea Forest Reserve and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

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Title: The roles of fungi in Hawaiian island ecosystems I. Fungal communities associated with leaf surfaces of three endemic vascular plants in Kilauea Forest Reserve and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Authors: Baker, Gladys E.
Dunn, Paul H.
Sakai, William A.
Keywords: Kilauea Forest Reserve
LC Subject Headings: Fungi -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Hawaii)
Ecology -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Issue Date: Jul 1974
Publisher: Island Ecosystems IRP, U.S. International Biological Program
Citation: Baker GE, Dunn PH, Sakai WA. 1974. The roles of fungi in Hawaiian island ecosystems I. Fungal communities associated with leaf surfaces of three endemic vascular plants in Kilauea Forest Reserve and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Honolulu (HI): Island Ecosystems IRP, U.S. International Biological Program. International Biological Program Technical Report, 42. 46 pages.
Series/Report no.: International Biological Program Technical Report
42
Abstract: Three vascular plants endemic in native forests of the Hawaiian Islands were assessed for their phylloplane communities of fungi. The total Metrosideros collina var. polymorpha community (residents and transients) was three times greater than that of Acacia koa. The Cheirodendron trigynum var. trigynum community was not considered significant because of fewer samples. Community overlap of the total populations was 14% for Metrosideros and Acacia; 10.6% for all three leaves. Resident populations, if determined as fungi recovered only by maceration, were represented by 40 species for Metrosideros and 30 for Acacia. The difference between total and resident populations or species abundance can be equated to leaf anatomy, particularly the surface as a trapping and supporting layer. Of the resident fungi only a few could be considered endemic species. This does not preclude the possibility that others may exist. Distribution of populations by elevation was sporadic and reflected no clear evidence for altitudinal control.
Description: Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.
Pages/Duration: 46 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/26968
Rights: CC0 1.0 Universal
Appears in Collections:International Biological Program Technical Reports (1970-1975)



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