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Succession patterns after pig digging in grassland communities of Mauna Loa, Hawaii

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Title: Succession patterns after pig digging in grassland communities of Mauna Loa, Hawaii
Authors: Spatz, Gunter
Mueller-Dombois, Dieter
LC Subject Headings: Grassland ecology -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Plant succession -- Hawaii -- Mauna Loa.
Mauna Loa (Hawaii Island, Hawaii)
Feral swine -- Hawaii -- Hawaii Island.
Issue Date: Nov 1972
Publisher: Island Ecosystems IRP, U.S. International Biological Program
Citation: Spatz G, Mueller-Dombois D. 1972. Succession patterns after pig digging in grassland communities on Mauna Loa, Hawaii. Honolulu (HI): Island Ecosystems IRP, U.S. International Biological Program. International Biological Program Technical Report, 15.
Series/Report no.: International Biological Program Report, 15
Abstract: The influence of feral pigs on the composition of grassland communities on the east flank of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, was studied for the one year period from July, 1971, to August, 1972. Actual pig-disturbed areas as well as artificially scalped plots were included in the study. The succession on those plots was measured by both frequency and cover measurements. It was found that pig digging greatly enlarges the component of introduced species in communities with a former high percentage of native species.
Sponsor: We wish to thank Rick Warshauer, Jim Jacobi and Grant Tanabe for their great help during field work and data processing.
Pages/Duration: 44 pages + plates
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/25943
Appears in Collections:International Biological Program Technical Reports (1970-1975)



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