Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/25355

Indigenous graduate students studying heritage languages at universities: A collaborative autoethnography

File SizeFormat 
25355.mp358.52 MBMP3View/Open
25355.pdf1.57 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Indigenous graduate students studying heritage languages at universities: A collaborative autoethnography
Issue Date: 12 Mar 2015
Description: Using collaborative autoethnography, this article explores the experiences of Indigenous graduate students as they navigate higher education and work to ensure the continuance of their heritage languages for future generations. The authors of this self-study represent diverse heritage languages and attend different universities across the United States. Following a discussion of Indigenous languages as tied to identity and a means to confront hegemonic power within universities, a review of the literature highlights new directions in language reclamation scholarship—particularly in the portrayal of youth, young adult, and postsecondary student contributions. The authors then present their experiences through vignettes, as well as an analysis of emerging themes. Ultimately, the article argues that, despite diverse backgrounds, the authors share a view of higher education as a tool—albeit one with limitations—that can enable them as effective contributors to language revitalization efforts.

Works Cited

Bainbridge, R. (2007). Autoethnography in Indigenous research contexts: The value of inner knowing. Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues, 10(2), 54-64.

Blodgett, A. T., Schinke, R. J., Smith, B., Peltier, and D. Pheasant, C. (2011). In Indigenous words: Exploring vignettes as a narrative strategy for presenting the research voices of Aboriginal community members. Qualitative Inquiry, 17(6), 522-533.

Brayboy, B. M. J. (2004). Hiding in the Ivy: American Indian students and visibility in elite educational settings. Harvard educational review 74(2), 125-152.

Brayboy, B. M. J. (2005). Transformational resistance and social justice: American Indians in Ivy League universities. Anthropology and Education Quarterly 36(3), 193–211.

Brayboy, B. M. J., Fann, A. J., Castagno, A. E., & Solyom, J. A. (2012). Postsecondary education for American Indian and Alaska Natives: Higher education for nation building and self-determination. ASHE Higher Education Report, 37(5).

Bucholtz, M., & Hall, K. (2005). Identity and interaction: a sociocultural linguistic approach. Discourse Studies, 7(4-5), 585-614.

Chang, H., Ngunjiri, F. W., & Hernandez, K. C. (2013). Collaborative autoethnography. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press.

Deloria, P. (2004). Indians in unexpected places. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas.

Deyhle, D. (1995). Navajo youth and Anglo racism: Cultural integrity and resistance. Harvard Educational Review, 65(4), 403–444.

Ellis, C., Adams, T. E., & Bochner, A. P. (2011). Autoethnography: An overview. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung/Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 12(1). Retrieved from http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101108

Ely, M., Vinz, R., Downing, M., and Anzul, M. (1997). On writing qualitative research: Living by words. Briston, PA: Falmer Press.

Foucault, M. (1983, October-November). Discourse and truth: the problematization of parrhesia. Lecture series conducted from University of California, Berkeley.

Gilmore, P. (2008). Engagement on the backroads: Insights for anthropology and education. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 39, 109-116.

Gilmore, P. (2013, November). Knowledge production in Indigenous scholarship: Fostering relationships, reciprocity, responsibility and respect through cross- institutional engagements. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Chicago, IL.

Hill, J. (2002). “Expert rhetorics” in advocacy for endangered languages: Who is listening and what do they hear? Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, 12(2), 119-33.
Hinton, L. (2014). Foreword. In Wyman, L. T. McCarty, T. L., & Nicholas, S. E. (Eds.),
Indigenous youth and bi/multilingualism: Language identity, ideology, and practice in dynamic cultural worlds (pp. ix-xiv). New York: Routledge.

Kipp, D. R. (2000). Encouragement, guidance, insights, and lessons learned for Native language activists developing their own tribal language programs. St. Paul: Grotto Foundation, Inc.

Kroupa, K. T. (2014). Efforts of the Ree-volution: Revitalizing Arikara language in an
endangered language context. In Wyman, L. T. McCarty, T. L., & Nicholas, S. E. (Eds.), Indigenous youth and bi/multilingualism: Language identity, ideology, and practice in dynamic cultural worlds (pp. 168-186). New York: Routledge.

Lee, T. S. (2009). Language, identity, and power: Navajo and Pueblo young adults’
perspectives and experiences with competing language ideologies. Journal of Language, Identity, and Education, 8, 307-320.

Lee, T. S. (2014). Critical language awareness among Native youth in New Mexico. In Wyman, L. T. McCarty, T. L., & Nicholas, S. E. (Eds.), Indigenous youth and bi/multilingualism: Language identity, ideology, and practice in dynamic cultural worlds (pp. 130-148). New York: Routledge.

Leonard, W. Y. (2011). Challenging “extinction” through modern Miami language practices. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 35(2), 135-160.

McCarty, T. L., Romero-Little, M. E., Warhol, L. & Zepeda, O. (2014). Genealogies of language loss and recovery: Native youth language practices and cultural continuance. In Wyman, L. T. McCarty, T. L., & Nicholas, S. E. (Eds.), Indigenous youth and bi/multilingualism: Language identity, ideology, and practice in dynamic cultural worlds (pp. 26-47). New York: Routledge.

Meek, B. A. (2011). Failing American Indian languages. American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 35(2), 43-60.

Ortiz, S. (1978). Song, poetry and language: Expression and perception. Tsaile, AZ: Navajo Community College Press.

Pithouse-Morgan, K., Khau, M., Masinga, L., & van de Ruit, C. (2012). Letters to those who dare feel: Using reflective letter-writing to explore the emotionality of research. International Journal of Qualitative Methods 11(1), 40-57.

Nicholas, S. E. (2009). “I live Hopi, I just don’t speak it.” –The critical intersection of
language, culture, and identity in the contemporary lives of Hopi youth. Journal of Language, Identity, and Education 8(5), 321-334.

Smith, L. T. (1999). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and Indigenous peoples.
New York: Zed Books Ltd.

Solórzano, D. G. and Bernal, D. D. (2001). Examining transformational resistance through a critical race theory and LatCrit theory framework: Chicana and Chicano students in an urban context. Urban Education, 36(3), 308–342.

Sumida Huaman, E. and Stokes, P. (2011). Indigenous language revitalization and new media: Postsecondary students as innovators. Global Media Journal, 11(18). Retrieved from http://lass.purduecal.edu/cca/gmj/sp11/gmj-sp11-article3.htm

Tuck, E. & Yang, K. W. (2013). R-words: Refusing research. In D. Paris & M. T. Winn (Eds.), Humanizing research: Decolonizing qualitative inquiry with youth and communities (pp. 223-247). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Wyman, L. T. (2012). Youth culture, language endangerment and linguistic survivance. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Wyman, L. T. (2014). Youth linguistic survivance in transforming settings: A Yup’ik example. In Wyman, L. T. McCarty, T. L., & Nicholas, S. E. (Eds.), Indigenous youth and bi/multilingualism: Language identity, ideology, and practice in dynamic cultural worlds (pp. 90-110). New York: Routledge.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/25355
Rights: Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Appears in Collections:4th International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation (ICLDC)



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.