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Polydora and Related Genera Associated with Hermit Crabs from the Indo-West Pacific (Polychaeta: Spionidae), with Descriptions of Two New Species and a Second Polydorid Egg Predator of Hermit Crabs

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Title: Polydora and Related Genera Associated with Hermit Crabs from the Indo-West Pacific (Polychaeta: Spionidae), with Descriptions of Two New Species and a Second Polydorid Egg Predator of Hermit Crabs
Authors: Williams, Jason D.
Issue Date: Oct 2001
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press
Citation: Williams JD. 2001. Polydora and related genera associated with hermit crabs from the Indo-West Pacific (Polychaeta: Spionidae), with descriptions of two new species and a second polydorid egg predator of hermit crabs. Pac Sci 55(4): 429-465.
Abstract: Polydora and related genera associated with hermit crabs from shallow
subtidal coral reef areas of the Indo-West Pacific are described. Over 2000
hermit crabs were collected from localities in the Philippines and Indonesia between
July 1997 and April 1999. In total, 10 species of polychaetes among five
genera (Boccardia, Carazziella, Dipolydora, Polydora, and Tripolydora) were identified
and described. Adult morphology of these species was investigated with
light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The study includes the description
of two new Polydora species, including the second known polydorid egg
predator of hermit crabs. Six of the species burrow into calcareous substrata,
living in burrows within live or dead gastropod shells or coralline algae attached
to shells. Two species were found in mud tubes within crevices of gastropod
shells inhabited by hermit crabs. The zoogeography and biodiversity of polydorids
from the West Pacific are discussed. The diversity of polydorids from
the Philippines is comparable with that of other central Pacific and Indo-West
Pacific islands, but it is lower than that in areas of the North and Southwest
Pacific; lower diversity probably reflects disparity in sampling efforts between
these regions. A key to the Philippine polydorids is provided.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/2510
ISSN: 0030-8870
Appears in Collections:Pacific Science Volume 55, Number 4, 2001



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