Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/24719

A tale of two worlds: A comparative study of language ecologies in Asia and the Americas

File SizeFormat 
anonby.pdf600.82 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: A tale of two worlds: A comparative study of language ecologies in Asia and the Americas
Authors: Anonby, Stan
Eberhard, David M.
Keywords: language ecology
Asia
Americas
language endangerment
Issue Date: Dec 2016
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
Citation: Anonby, Stan & David M. Eberhard. 2016. A tale of two worlds: A comparative study of language ecologies in Asia and the Americas. Language Documentation & Conservation 10. 601-628.
Abstract: Language use patterns of individual speech communities are largely conditioned by the different language ecologies in which they are immersed. We believe this ecological stance helps explain why minority languages of Asia are more likely to be sustainable than those in the Americas. We have identified fourteen traits which characterize ecologies in general, describing how they play out differently in the Americas versus Asia. Each trait is considered to be on a continuum, with opposing values that measure whether conditions are more or less favorable to language maintenance. On one side of the continuum, we discuss the values in the Americas, and explain how these are more favorable to language shift. On the other side of the scale, we talk about the values in Asia, and explain how these are more conducive to language maintenance. To show the application of these traits, the paper also includes two in-depth case studies as prototypical examples from each area, one from the Americas and one from Asia. We conclude with some comments about how these traits can be useful for those engaged in language development work.
Sponsor: National Foreign Language Resource Center
Pages/Duration: 28 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/24719
ISSN: 1934-5275
Rights: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Appears in Collections:Volume 10 : Language Documentation & Conservation



This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons