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Quantifying the Mulligan River Pituri Trade of Central Australia

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Title: Quantifying the Mulligan River Pituri Trade of Central Australia
Authors: Silcock, Jenny Lesley
Tischler, Max
Smith, Mike
Keywords: Hawaiians--Ethnobotany--Periodicals.
Plants, Medicinal--Periodicals.
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Botany Department, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Citation: Silcock JL, Tischler M, Smith M. 2012. Quantifying the Mulligan River Pituri Trade of Central Australia. Ethnobotany Research & Applications 10: 37-44.
Abstract: Pituri (Duboisia hopwoodii (F. Muell.) F. Muell.) (Solanaceae) is a narcotic shrub which grows in the parallel dune fields of the Simpson Desert of far south-western Queensland, Australia. The ethnographic literature points to an impressive scale of trade of pituri between Aboriginal groups across inland eastern Australia, and suggests total annual production of 2500-3000 kg of dried plant material. However, there has been no attempt to assess the feasibility of these figures, or investigate the number of pituri plants required to sustain such a scale of trade. We mapped the distribution and density of D. hopwoodii along four one km wide transects, totally 130 km in length. Our results suggest that the population of pituri west of the Mulligan River could number around 36,000 mature plants. Ninety randomly selected plants were measured, and the foliage of six of these was harvested and dried. Plants yielded between 0.15 and 6.68 kg of dry matter. Our 90 measured plants would have yielded around 155 kg of dried pituri. Therefore, between 1450 and 1740 plants would be required to sustain the purported level of trade and use. With knowledge of the location of dense pituri groves and highly efficient expeditions, harvesting this number of plants is feasible. However, numerous questions remain surrounding the ecological and ethnographic aspects of the pituri trade.
Pages/Duration: 8 pages
ISSN: 1547-3465
Appears in Collections:2012 - Volume 10 : Ethnobotany Research and Applications

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