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Population Characteristics of the Mangrove Crab Scylla serrata (Decapoda: Portunidae) in Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia: Effects of Harvest and Implications for Management.

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Title: Population Characteristics of the Mangrove Crab Scylla serrata (Decapoda: Portunidae) in Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia: Effects of Harvest and Implications for Management.
Authors: Bonine, Kimberly M.
Bjorkstedt, Eric P.
Ewel, Katherine C.
Palik, Moses
LC Subject Headings: Natural history--Periodicals.
Science--Periodicals
Natural history--Pacific Area--Periodicals.
Issue Date: Jan 2008
Publisher: Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press
Citation: Bonine KM, Bjorkstedt EP, Ewel KC, Palik M. Population Characteristics of the Mangrove Crab Scylla serrata (Decapoda: Portunidae) in Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia: Effects of Harvest and Implications for Management. Pac Sci 62(1): 1-20.
Series/Report no.: vol. 62, no. 1
Abstract: Apparent declines in abundance of mangrove crabs Scylla serrata (Forsska°l, 1755) in Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia, have prompted concern regarding long-term persistence of this important cultural and economic resource. To support development of effective management strategies, we gathered basic biological information about mangrove crabs on this island, where S. serrata is the only mangrove crab species present. In particular, we were interested in understanding movement patterns and evaluating spatial variation in population structure. Many population characteristics, including estimated life span, ontogenetic shifts in habitat use, sex-specific allometric relationships, male-biased sex ratios, and evidence for limited (<2 km) alongshore movement, are similar to those reported elsewhere in the range of the species. Therefore, insights from S. serrata populations elsewhere might usefully inform management of the species on Kosrae. Moreover, information reported in this study, for which there is no ambiguity about species identification, has broader relevance. Spatial variation in size structure of the population appears to be driven by variable harvest pressure that reflects distribution of the human population and location of emerging commercial harvest operations. Effective management of mangrove crabs is therefore likely to benefit from application of size-based or sex-based restrictions on harvest and might usefully incorporate spatially explicit strategies, such as partial or complete reserves. Development and implementation of effective management will necessarily depend on cultural as well as scientific information.
Description: v. ill. 23 cm.
Quarterly
Pages/Duration: 20 p.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/22679
ISSN: 0030-8870
Appears in Collections:Pacific Science, Volume 62, Number 1, 2008



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