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Item Summary

Title: Through Khaki Tinted Lenses: An Analysis of New Zealanders' Impressions of the Pacific During World War II
Authors: Pethig, Jennifer L.
Keywords: Polynesia - New Zealand
LC Subject Headings: World War, 1939-45--New Zealand.
New Zealand--Oceania.
Issue Date: 1995
Abstract: Between the years 1939 and 1945, over 40,000 New Zealanders entered Pacific Islands (Brooking 1988). For many it was their first experience "over seas," their first time out of New Zealand. It was also for most their first time in a war zone. There they saw, heard of and participated in the act of war. They were exposed to a frenzied mix of emotions- terror, fear, excitement, boredom, loneliness, death and violence. For many it could be considered a time of initiation with actions, sights, smells, sounds and people which were new, exotic, emotive, familiar and unfamiliar. It was also a time of "first contact" with aspects of themselves. All this occurred under and because of circumstances which evoked extreme mental stress, constant anticipation, trepidation, frustration, racism and bureaucracy. This thesis examines the racial experiences and attitudes of some of these New Zealanders as they encountered Pacific Islanders and other peoples they met or heard of in the Pacific war.
Description: Thesis (M.A.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1995
Pacific Islands Studies
Pages/Duration: viii, 198 pages
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/21118
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Pacific Islands Studies Plan A Masters Theses
M.A. - Pacific Islands Studies



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