Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20912

Shade coffee in Hawai'i---quality, physiology, and biochemistry

File Description SizeFormat 
HAWN_AC1.H3_5127_uh.pdfVersion for UH users2.18 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
HAWN_AC1.H3_5127_r.pdfVersion for non-UH users. Copying/Printing is not permitted2.18 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Shade coffee in Hawai'i---quality, physiology, and biochemistry
Authors: Steiman, Shawn R.
Issue Date: 2008
Abstract: To explore the effects of shade level and type on coffee in Hawai'i, Coffea arabica L. was shaded with varying degrees of black and aluminized shade cloth, macadamia trees, and a novel, spray-on shade composed mostly of kaolin. These treatments were compared to unshaded coffee. Two locations were used in this experiment: Kunia, O'ahu and Kona, Hawai'i. The shading was imposed after the first major flowering of the season and maintained for 2 complete harvests. Measurements were made on yields, bean characteristics, specific leaf area, leaf temperature, leaf nutrient levels, nodal growth, organoleptic quality and photosynthetic response. Brewed coffee samples were analyzed using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatogtaphy to capture and analyze brewed coffee volatiles. These volatiles were used to predict organoleptic quality and group membership based on location, year of harvest and shade treatment. In addition, application of kaolin was explored using glass plates and slides to determine coverage and light transmittance. Shading resulted in statistically different yields in the macadamia (16% of sun) and kaolin (199% of sun) treatments in the second year, although a negative, linear trend was observed with increased shading. The lack of significant differences in yields between the cloth shaded and sun treatments was likely a result of1arge yield variation. Bean sizes were generally larger in shaded treatments and only the percentage of defects and broken beans were lower for the kaolin treatment in the second year in Kunia. Kona bean sizes were larger in the sun treatment but no differences were observed in bean characteristics. Kaolin treated plants responded similarly to sun plants for most measurements, although the responses tended to be more extreme when compared to the shade cloth and macadamia treatments. Kaolin treated leaves were 3.4°C cooler than sun leaves and photosynthesized 71 % more CO2 than sun plants. Shading did not appreciably affect organoleptic quality. Furthermore, brewed coffee volatiles were not good predictors of organoleptic quality. However, with few to no misclassifications, the volatiles could accurately predict group membership.
Description: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2008.
Measurements were made on yields, bean characteristics, specific leaf area, leaf temperature, leaf nutrient levels, nodal growth, organoleptic quality and photosynthetic response. Brewed coffee samples were analyzed using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography to capture and analyze brewed coffee volatiles. These volatiles were used topredict organoleptic quality and group membership based on location, year of harvest and shade treatment. In addition, application of kaolin was explored using glass plates and slides to determine coverage and light transmittance.
Shading did not appreciably affect organoleptic quality. Furthermore, brewed coffee volatiles were not good predictors of organoleptic quality. However, with few to no misclassifications, the volatiles could accurately predict group membership.
Shading resulted in statistically different yields in the macadamia (16% of sun) and kaolin (199% of sun) treatments in the second year, although a negative, linear trend was observed with increased shading. The lack of significant differences in yields between the cloth shaded and sun treatments was likely a result of large yield variation. Bean sizes were generally larger in shaded treatments and only the percentage of defects and broken beans were lower for the kaolin treatment in the second year in Kunia. Kona bean sizes were larger in the sun treatment but no differences were observed in bean characteristics. Kaolin treated plants responded similarly to sun plants for most measurements, although the responses tended to be more extreme when compared to the shade cloth and macadamia treatments. Kaolin treated leaves were 3.4°C cooler than sun leaves and photosynthesized 71% more CO2 than sun plants.
To explore the effects of shade level and type on coffee in Hawai'i, Coffea arabica L. was shaded with varying degrees of black and aluminized shade cloth, macadamia trees, and a novel, spray-on shade composed mostly of kaolin. These treatments were compared to unshaded coffee. Two locations were used in this experiment: Kunia, O'ahu and Kona, Hawai'i. The shading was imposed after the first major flowering of the season and maintained for 2 complete harvests.
show 3 moreIncludes bibliographical references (leaves xxx-xxx).
Also available by subscription via World Wide Web
78 leaves, bound 29 cm

show less
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20912
ISBN: 9780549808411
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.