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Psychometric properties of the Concerns about Change Scale : An exploration of concerns about recovery in eating disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder

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Title: Psychometric properties of the Concerns about Change Scale : An exploration of concerns about recovery in eating disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder
Authors: Gray, Jennifer A.
Issue Date: 2008
Abstract: The aim of the present research was to further refine the Concerns about Change Scale (CCS), a self-report instrument designed to assess a wide range of potential concerns that may interfere with changing dysfunctional attitudes and behaviors. Initial studies employing this measure in eating disorder (ED), anxiety disorder, and substance abuse samples have provided preliminary support for its reliability and validity, but use of the scale is limited without a more comprehensive examination of its psychometric properties. In the current study, two samples were assessed, the first comprised of230 females diagnosed with EDs and the second of 30 individuals diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Factor analysis of the CCS in the ED sample yielded eight factors, accounting for 57.71 % of the variance. Strong support was found for the internal consistency of the CCS total scale (α=.96) and eight factor subscales (range α=.87-.92). Convergent validity was supported through significant correlations between the CCS and eating disorder symptoms (as measured by the EDI-2 Drive for Thinness and Body Dissatisfaction subscales). Significant correlations were also obtained between the CCS and measures of depression (Le., Beck Depression Inventory-2; Brief Symptom Inventory-Depression subscale) and anxiety (i.e., Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety subscale). The newly derived factor analytic structure was applied to the OCD sample. Comparison of the OCD and ED groups demonstrated that the ED sample scored significantly higher than the OCD sample on every factor. The relationship between the CCS and OCD symptom severity was examined, but none of the 8 factors were significantly correlated with OCD symptom severity (as measured by the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Scale). These findings suggest that the CCS has strong psychometric properties within an ED sample and may be a useful tool for the measurement of attitudes that may inhibit behavioral change. In addition, the CCS shows promise in differentiating concerns about change among various forms of psychopathology, as well as other behavioral patterns. Knowledge of the concerns about change held by individuals with different disorders may provide valuable insight about how to target these concerns effectively during interventions. Further research is needed to establish the validity and reliability of the instrument across other forms of psychopathology and to examine its ability to predict treatment response in patients with EDs.
Description: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2008.
The aim of the present research was to further refine the Concerns about Change Scale (CCS), a self-report instrument designed to assess a wide range of potential concerns that may interfere with changing dysfunctional attitudes and behaviors. Initial studies employing this measure in eating disorder (ED), anxiety disorder, and substance abuse samples have provided preliminary support for its reliability and validity, but use of the scale is limited without a more comprehensive examination of its psychometric properties. In the current study, two samples were assessed, the first comprised of 230 females diagnosed with EDs and the second of 30 individuals diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Factor analysis of the CCS in the ED sample yielded eight factors, accounting for 57.71% of the variance. Strong support was found for the internal consistency of the CCS total scale (alpha=.96) and eight factor subscales (range alpha=.87-.92). Convergent validity was supported through significant correlations between the CCS and eating disorder symptoms (as measured by the EDI-2 Drive for Thinness and Body Dissatisfaction subscales). Significant correlations were also obtained between the CCS and measures of depression (i.e., Beck Depression Inventory-2; Brief Symptom Inventory-Depression subscale) and anxiety (i.e., Brief Symptom Inventory-Anxiety subscale). The newly derived factor analytic structure was applied to the OCD sample. Comparison of the OCD and ED groups demonstrated that the ED sample scored significantly higher than the OCD sample on every factor. The relationship between the CCS and OCD symptom severity was examined, but none of the 8 factors were significantly correlated with OCD symptom severity (as measured by the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Scale). These findings suggest that the CCS has strong psychometric properties within an ED sample and may be a useful tool for the measurement of attitudes that may inhibit behavioral change. In addition, the CCS shows promise in differentiating concerns about change among various forms of psychopathology, as well as other behavioral patterns. Knowledge of the concerns about change held by individuals with different disorders may provide valuable insight about how to target these concerns effectively during interventions.
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 105-131).
Also available by subscription via World Wide Web
131 leaves, bound 29 cm
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20851
ISBN: 9780549780731
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Psychology



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