Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20848

Temperament, parental anxiety and their role in the development of child anxious psychopathology

File Description SizeFormat 
HAWN ACI_5122_r.pdfVersion for non-UH users. Copying/Printing is not permitted3.55 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
HAWN ACI_5122_uh.pdfVersion for UH users3.54 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Temperament, parental anxiety and their role in the development of child anxious psychopathology
Authors: Phillips, Lisa K.
Issue Date: 2008
Abstract: Much emphasis has been placed on parental contribution in the development and progression of psychopathology. Although it has been established that children of parents with anxiety disorders are at greater risk for developing anxious psychopathology themselves (e.g., Dadds & Roth, 2001; Rosenbaum, Biederman, Hirschfield, Bolduc, & Chaloff, 1991), the specific developmental path is not yet completely understood (Kendall & Ollendick, 2004). This cross-sectional study examined how child temperament (e.g., negative affectivity - NA) and parental anxiety symptom expression were related to the development of anxiety in a clinically referred sample of 570 children and adolescents. Structural equation modeling provides evidence that both child NA and parental anxiety were associated with child anxiety. Secondly, the relationship between parent and child anxiety symptoms was significant even when controlling for the influence of child NA. In other words, there was an association between child and parent anxiety that was not accounted for by the temperamental dimension of NA. Finally, in younger children (ages 7 to 11), parent anxiety's influence on child anxiety was weaker than in older children (ages 12 to 19), suggesting that, as children grow older, the influence of parental anxious behavior grows stronger.
Description: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2008.
Much emphasis has been placed on parental contribution in the development and progression of psychopathology. Although it has been established that children of parents with anxiety disorders are at greater risk for developing anxious psychopathology themselves (e.g., Dadds & Roth, 2001; Rosenbaum, Biederman, Hirschfield, Bolduc, & Chaloff, 1991), the specific developmental path is not yet completely understood (Kendall & Ollendick, 2004). This cross-sectional study examined how child temperament (e.g., negative affectivity - NA) and parental anxiety symptom expression were related to the development of anxiety in a clinically referred sample of 570 children and adolescents. Structural equation modeling provides evidence that both child NA and parental anxiety were associated with child anxiety. Secondly, the relationship between parent and child anxiety symptoms was significant even when controlling for the influence of child NA. In other words, there was an association between child and parent anxiety that was not accounted for by the temperamental dimension of NA. Finally, in younger children (ages 7 to 11), parent anxiety's influence on child anxiety was weaker than in older children (ages 12 to 19), suggesting that, as children grow older, the influence of parental anxious behavior grows stronger.
Includes bibliographical references (leaves xxx-xxx).
Also available by subscription via World Wide Web
94 leaves, bound 29 cm
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20848
ISBN: 9780549787730
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Psychology



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.