Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20847

Aloha `aina : A Hawaiian garden intervention designed to plant the seeds of recovery in persons with severe and persistent mental illness

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Item Summary

Title: Aloha `aina : A Hawaiian garden intervention designed to plant the seeds of recovery in persons with severe and persistent mental illness
Authors: Isaacs, Patti Mieko
Issue Date: 2008
Abstract: This study was the first of its kind to evaluate the adaptation of a traditional, empirically supported, Western treatment of family education and social skills training to fit the needs of individuals of Pacific Islander and Asian culture with severe and persistent mental illness. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Aloha Garden, a Hawaiian garden intervention program designed to promote recovery in individuals with severe and persistent mental illness at the Hawai'i State Hospital. The heart of the Aloha Garden is aloha'aina (love of the land) which is assumed to be central in the healing of Native Hawaiian individuals. It is also assumed that the teaching of Hawaiian values in a "real life setting" is applicable to other minority clients who share similar beliefs and expectations as Native Hawaiians. The effects of the Aloha Garden were examined prospectively using measures of recovery, hope, spirituality, aggression, and treatment compliance. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the quantitative data. One qualitative question on the effects of the Aloha Garden on recovery was asked of the participants in the Aloha Garden. Over the eleven-month period of study, both Aloha Garden participants and non-participants demonstrated improved environmental recovery, hope, and spirituality. In addition, the Aloha Garden participants had statistically higher personal recovery and treatment compliance and lower incidence of aggression than the study participants not involved in the Aloha Garden. The effects of Aloha 'Aina were not limited to individuals who identified with Hawaiian and Asian cultures but were also found to improve recovery in individuals of Western cultures.
Description: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2008.
This study was the first of its kind to evaluate the adaptation of a traditional, empirically supported, Western treatment of family education and social skills training to fit the needs of individuals of Pacific Islander and Asian culture with severe and persistent mental illness. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Aloha Garden, a Hawaiian garden intervention program designed to promote recovery in individuals with severe and persistent mental illness at the Hawaii State Hospital. The heart of the Aloha Garden is aloha `aina (love of the land) which is assumed to be central in the healing of Native Hawaiian individuals. It is also assumed that the teaching of Hawaiian values in a "real life setting" is applicable to other minority clients who share similar beliefs and expectations as Native Hawaiians. The effects of the Aloha Garden were examined prospectively using measures of recovery, hope, spirituality, aggression, and treatment compliance. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the quantitative data. One qualitative question on the effects of the Aloha Garden on recovery was asked of the participants in the Aloha Garden. Over the eleven-month period of study, both Aloha Garden participants and non-participants demonstrated improved environmental recovery, hope, and spirituality. In addition, the Aloha Garden participants had statistically higher personal recovery and treatment compliance and lower incidence of aggression than the study participants not involved in the Aloha Garden. The effects of Aloha `Aina were not limited to individuals who identified with Hawaiian and Asian cultures but were also found to improve recovery in individuals of Western cultures.
Includes bibliographical references (leaves xxx-xxx).
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163 leaves, bound 29 cm
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20847
ISBN: 9780549780779
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Psychology



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