Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20673

The relationship between heart rate variability, self-perception, exercise, mood, and sleep indicies in collegiate women's track and field during a competitive season

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Item Summary

Title: The relationship between heart rate variability, self-perception, exercise, mood, and sleep indicies in collegiate women's track and field during a competitive season
Authors: Leonhardt, Lorita P.A
Issue Date: 2008
Abstract: This research examined in-season changes in physiological and psychological measures, and related them to training over time (4-months) in women's track and field during a competitive collegiate season. Fifteen female athletes between the ages of 18 and 24 years old participated. Each participant completed the Exercise Orientation Questionnaire (EOQ), where four questions were derived from the Self-Loathing Subsca1e (SLSS) questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) Questionnaire, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) Standard Form Questionnaire, and heart rate variability (HRV) testing protocols during each of their four testing sessions. Testing sessions included the application of a tilt table to measure the LFIHF ratio in female track and field athletes. A developmental and quasi-experimental research design with repeated measures was employed in this study. Data collection of the LFIHF ratio occurred across three plains (0 degrees, 70 degrees, and 0 degrees). The test results revealed that there were no significant differences in the following: (1) LFIHF ratio over the four trials due to the high amount of in-season training that they received over a period of 4-months; (2) comparison to the POMS and SLSS questionnaires as a covariate; and (3) comparing the ESS questionnaire as a covariate. In conclusion, the physiological stress from the tilt table testing did not seem to affect the participant's ability to adapt to physiological stress over the four trials, however, it can be noted that when using the ESS questionnaire as a covariate, data appear to be approaching significance.
Description: Thesis (M.S.)--University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2008.
Includes bibliographical references (leaves 86-90).
x, 90 leaves, bound 29 cm
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/20673
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:M.S. - Kinesiology and Leisure Science



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