Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/19980

From Full Dusk to Full Tusk: Reimagining the "Dusky Maiden" through the Visual Arts

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Title: From Full Dusk to Full Tusk: Reimagining the "Dusky Maiden" through the Visual Arts
Authors: Tamaira, A. Marata
Keywords: Dusky Maiden
goddesses
ancestresses
liminality
Polynesia
show 2 morePolynesianism
visual arts

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LC Subject Headings: Oceania -- Periodicals
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: University of Hawai‘i Press
Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Citation: Tamaira, M. A. 2010. From Full Dusk to Full Tusk: Reimagining the "Dusky Maiden" through the Visual Arts. The Contemporary Pacific 22 (1): 1-35.
Abstract: For centuries the image of the Dusky Maiden has occupied a prominent place in
the Western imagination. Indeed, nowhere has it been so effectively shaped and
deployed than through the visual arts. Portrayed as naive belles-cum-femme fatales
through early Western paintings and later photographs, Polynesian women were presented to foreign audiences as symbols of the exotic, erotic, and dangerous. In the contemporary period, female Polynesian artists have sought to reconceptualize,
challenge, subvert, and invert the image of their dusky maiden “sibling” in order to open up alternative spaces in which to reread this centuries-old icon. Here, I focus on the visual art creations of three women: Rosanna Raymond,
Shigeyuki Kihara, and Sue Pearson, each of whom is actively engaged in reinscribing the stereotype of the Dusky Maiden with new and empowering meaning.
Pages/Duration: 35 p.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/19980
ISSN: 1043-898X
Appears in Collections:TCP [The Contemporary Pacific ], 2010 - Volume 22, Number 1



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