Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/1886

WRRCTR No.123 Hawaiian Waste Injection Practices and Problems

File SizeFormat 
wrrctr123.pdf4.35 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: WRRCTR No.123 Hawaiian Waste Injection Practices and Problems
Authors: Petty, Susan
Peterson, Frank L.
Keywords: groundwater
injection
sewage effluents
clogging
suspended solids
show 7 moremicroorganisms
Hawaii
Ghyben-Herzberg lens
rehabilitation
Oahu
Maui
Kauai

show less
LC Subject Headings: Sewage disposal in the ground -- Hawaii.
Groundwater -- Pollution -- Hawaii.
Injection wells -- Hawaii.
Issue Date: Jan 1979
Publisher: Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Citation: Petty S, Peterson FL. 1979. Hawaiian waste injection practices and problems. Honolulu (HI): Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa. WRRC technical report, 123.
Series/Report no.: WRRC Technical Report
123
Abstract: In recent years in Hawai'i numerous shallow waste injection wells, constructed for the disposal of domestic sewage effluent, have failed to operate as designed or desired. In the course of this study a field reconnaissance of all the known waste injection wells on O'ahu and Kaua'i, and approximately half of those on Maui, was made and their methods of operation and injection problems evaluated. The results of this study
indicate that injection well problems are primarily due to physical and biological, and probably to a much lesser extent, chemical clogging phenomena at the well face. The clogging in a large part results from
improper treatment plant operation, improper injection well operation and maintenance, and poor well site selection. Improper well construction practices also contribute to a much lesser degree. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that inadequate data collection, both prior to and after injection has begun, makes early detection and solution
of the injection problems more difficult. Recommendations for more adequate data collection and treatment plant and injection well operation and maintenance are made which hopefully will avoid or at least alleviate
many of the injection well problems encountered in this study.
Sponsor: Department of Health, State of Hawaii Grant/Contract No. 78-171
Pages/Duration: viii + 104 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/1886
Appears in Collections:WRRC Technical Reports



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.