Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/17243

Embodying Okhotsk Ethnicity: Human Skeletal Remains from the Aonae Dune Site, Okushiri Island, Hokkaido

File SizeFormat 
AP-v45n1-1-23.pdf3.84 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Embodying Okhotsk Ethnicity: Human Skeletal Remains from the Aonae Dune Site, Okushiri Island, Hokkaido
Authors: Matsumura, Hirofumi
Hudson, Mark J.
Koshida, Kenichiro
Minakawa, Yoichi
Keywords: Hokkaido
Okhotsk culture
Aonae Dune site
osteological analyses
ethnicity
LC Subject Headings: Prehistoric peoples--Asia--Periodicals.
Prehistoric peoples--Oceania--Periodicals.
Asia--Antiquities--Periodicals.
Oceania--Antiquities--Periodicals.
East Asia--Antiquities--Periodicals.
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press (Honolulu)
Citation: Matsumura, H., M. J. Hudson, K. Koshida, and Y. Minakawa. 2006. Embodying Okhotsk Ethnicity: Human Skeletal Remains from the Aonae Dune Site, Okushiri Island, Hokkaido. Asian Perspectives 45 (1): 1-23.
Series/Report no.: Volume 45
Number 1
Abstract: This article describes human skeletal remains from the Aonae Dune site, Okushiri Island, Hokkaido, Japan. Skeletal remains of an adult female and two sub adults were excavated in 2002. Although these remains derived from Okhotsk culture contexts, analyses of cranial and tooth crown measurements demonstrated that Aonae Dune No.1 (the adult female), Aonae Dune No.2 (a child of about 11 years), and Aonae Dune No.3 (a child of about 6 years) are morphologically closer to Epi-Jomon or Jomon and Ainu populations and significantly different from other Okhotsk samples in Hokkaido. It is argued that these three skeletons probably represent individuals from a different culture who were adopted into Okhotsk society. KEYWORDS: Hokkaido, Okhotsk culture, Aonae Dune site, osteological analyses, ethnicity.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/17243
ISSN: 1535-8283 (E-ISSN)
0066-8435 (Print)
Appears in Collections:Asian Perspectives, 2006 - Volume 45, Number 1 (Spring)



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.