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Contained Identities: The Demise of Yapese Clay Pots

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Title: Contained Identities: The Demise of Yapese Clay Pots
Authors: Descantes, Christophe
Keywords: Yap
pottery
ceramic change
colonialism
LC Subject Headings: Prehistoric peoples--Asia--Periodicals.
Prehistoric peoples--Oceania--Periodicals.
Asia--Antiquities--Periodicals.
Oceania--Antiquities--Periodicals.
East Asia--Antiquities--Periodicals.
Issue Date: 2001
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press (Honolulu)
Citation: Descantes, C. 2001. Contained Identities: The Demise of Yapese Clay Pots. Asian Perspectives 40 (2): 227-43.
Series/Report no.: Volume 40
Number 2
Abstract: The loss of ceramic technology is Widespread in Oceanic island societies. While this disappearance has taken place at different times, under different conditions, on different Pacific Islands, a model created by examining the technology loss of one society may cast light on the contributing factors to the decline of ceramic production of other Oceanic contexts. A model to account for the relatively recent end of ceramic pot production and use on the island of Yap, Federated States of Micronesia, during the colonial period is offered. Ceramic manufacture on Yap was at least a 2000-year-old tradition before it ceased in the twentieth century. Relying on a historical approach that considers the social dynamics of pots and a combination of archaeological, ethnographic, and ethnohistoric records, the Yapese gradually replaced their ceramic vessel technology with metal pots because of new conditions encountered during contact and colonialism. Factors involved in the ease of replacement of ceramic pots include limited access to the specialized labor required to produce ceramic containers, the superior durability offered by the replacement technology, and the fact that ceramic pots were valued more for their function. KEYWORDS: Yap, pottery, ceramic change, colonialism.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/17155
ISSN: 1535-8283 (E-ISSN)
0066-8435 (Print)
Appears in Collections:Asian Perspectives, 2001 - Volume 40, Number 2 (Fall)



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