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Item Summary

Title: The Effects of ultraviolet radiation on skeletal growth and bleaching in four species of Hawaiian corals
Authors: Goodman, Gwen Davies
LC Subject Headings: Ecology.
Zoology.
Issue Date: May-1991
Publisher: California State University, Long Beach
Citation: Goodman, Gwen Davies. The effects of ultraviolet radiation on skeletal growth and bleaching in four species of Hawaiian corals. Long Beach: California State University, Long Beach, 1991.
Abstract: Coral bleaching has been attributed to many factors, including
increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV). The effects of
partial and full spectrum UV on coral skeletal growth and bleaching
were investigated. Responses were species-specific and depthdependent.
Montipora verrucosa, Pocillopora damicornis, and P. danai
collected from 1 m maintained or increased their calcification rates
when exposed to partial UV or shielded from UV. M. verrucosa
collected from 1.5 mexhibited bleaching via zooxanthella loss
regardless of the UV treatment, probably because of reduced salinity
and water temperature. M. verrucosa collected from 8.5 m bleached
only when exposed to increased intensities of PAR, while Porites
compressa collected from 8.5 m bleached only when exposed to
increases in both PAR and UV. All bleaching resulted from loss of
zooxanthellae rather than loss of pigment from zooxanthellae. Lower
surface augmentation of color via zooxanthella increases often
occurred with a corresponding decrease in upper surface zooxanthella
density.
Pages/Duration: 90 pages
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/16330
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Kaneohe Bay Research



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