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Title: Won't You Please Come Back to Guam? Media Discourse, Military Buildup, and Chamorro in the Space Between 
Author: Viernes, James Perez
Date: 2009
Publisher: Honolulu: Center for Pacific Islands Studies, School of Pacific and Asian Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Citation: Viernes, J. P. 2009. Won't You Please Come Back to Guam? Media Discourse, Military Buildup, and Chamorro in the Space Between. In The Space Between: Negotiating Culture, Place, and Identity in the Pacific, edited by A. Marata Tamaira, 103-118. Occasional Paper Series 44. Honolulu, Hawai‘i: Center for Pacific Islands Studies, School of Pacific and Asian Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.
Abstract: In October 2005, Guam’s major daily newspaper, the Pacific Daily News (PDN), reported on the United States Department of Defense decision to relocate over 7,000 US Marines and their dependents from Okinawa, Japan, to Guam. Politicians and businessmen lauded the decision as a potential boon to the island’s economy. Over the next few years, the Pacific Daily News served as the primary print medium through which a dominant discourse was promulgated in support of military expansion. In this paper, I provide an historic framework for understanding the kinds of discourses that have emerged in Guam in relation to US military presence on the island. This paper also considers the various modes of indigenous resistance that have been enacted on Guam—in both the past andthe present—as means of disrupting the prevailing assumption that Chamorros wholeheartedly accept the US colonial agenda. This analysis is also revealing of ways in which Chamorros navigate the space between their indigenous identity and the experience of living under US colonialism in the twenty-first century.
Series/Report No.: Occasional Papers no. 44 / Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Occasional paper series / Center for Pacific Islands Studies, School of Pacific and Asian Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Description: Paper submitted to The Space Between: Negotiating Culture, Place, and Identity in the Pacific; based on the indigenous Oceanic concept, va, a space marked by tension and transformation and by confluences and connections
Pages/Duration: 16 p.
ISSN: 0897-8905
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/14690
Keywords: Guam, Chamorro, Micronesia, United States, military, media, US Marines

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