Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/13740

Cultural Studies for Oceania

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Item Summary

Title: Cultural Studies for Oceania
Authors: Wood, Houston
Keywords: cultural studies
decolonization
epistemology
identity
Oceania
show 2 moreoral traditions
Pacific studies

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LC Subject Headings: Oceania -- Periodicals.
Issue Date: 2003
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press
Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Citation: Wood, H. 2003. Cultural Studies for Oceania. The Contemporary Pacific 15 (2): 340-74.
Abstract: A new research perspective is emerging in Oceania, one based on combining
practices drawn from both Pacific Islander and continental cultures. This emerging
perspective, here labeled “cultural studies for Oceania,” differs from most
Pacific Studies research as well as from continental cultural studies. This new
practice is characterized by combinations of the following: an emphasis on personal
identities and on specifying distinct research roles for Pacific Islanders and
non-Natives; efforts to forge a unifying regional identity; research focused on
processes more than on final products; reciprocity between researchers and those
they study; prominent use of Oceania epistemologies; unconventional researchreporting
genres; reliance on oral practices and traditions; dependence on Pacific
Islander models, concepts, and theories. Research programs that embrace these
features offer a promising alternative to the dominant research practices in the
region, which continue to perpetuate earlier colonizations.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/13740
ISSN: 1043-898X
Appears in Collections:TCP [The Contemporary Pacific ], 2003 - Volume 15, Number 2



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