Browsing Proceedings of the Sustainable Taro Culture for the Pacific Conference by Title

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  • Manner, Harley I (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    In comparison to Cyrtospenna chamissonis, Pandanus tectorius, and breadfruit (Artocapus altitis and A. mariennensis), the significance and cultivation of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott in the atolls and low islands of ...
  • Taotua, Fuifui (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    A Rapid Rural Appraisal was conducted in American Samoa in 1989 to document traditional agricultural practices associated with the growing of taro. From this survey, 22 cultivars of taro were documented where all farmers ...
  • George, Takumi (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    Kosrae is one of four states in the Federated States of Micronesia. Subsistence farming and banana production are the main agricultural enterprises. The main subsistence crops are banana, breadfruit, citrus fruit, coconut, ...
  • Falanruw, M C (1993-01)
    The documentation of traditional methods of growing taro is a major objective of the Low-Input Sustainable Agriculture Taro Project. On Yap, almost all taro is grown by low-input traditional methods without the use of ...
  • Ngiralmau, Meresbang (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    This paper reports the results of a project to research and document the traditional techniques of taro production in Palau. The researchers concluded that: 1) both pesticides and commercial fertilizer have no major ...
  • Tipton, Trace V; Brown, John W; Leung, PingSun (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    Much of the taro (Colocasia esculenta var. antiquorum) that is produced in the Pacific is not traded in the market, but rather it is used for other non-market purposes. Taro is used for home consumption, for social and ...
  • Liloqula, Ruth; Saelea, Jimi; Levela, Helen (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    Taro (Colocasia esculenta), yams (Dioscorea spp.), sweet potato (Ipomea babatas), and Cassava (Manihot esculenta) are the four major root crops grown throughout the islands and are components of the daily diet. Taro and ...
  • Penn, David C (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    Taro is a spiritual and nutritional center of Hawaiian culture, and the future of sustainable taro culture in Hawai 'i depends upon water. Water needs for expanded wetland and dryland field systems can be filled if physical ...
  • Ragus, L N; Almario, V M; Richards, H (University of Hawaii, 1993-01)
    This experiment conducted at Sabana, Rota from October, 1990 to June, 1991 determined the yield and profitability of growing taro under three weed management schemes. These were weeding taro at 60 and 120 days after planting ...
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