Browsing Proceedings of Taking Taro into the 1990s: A Taro Conference by Issue Date

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Now showing items 1-17 of 17

  • Leung, PingSun; Sato, Dwight (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    This study provides an update of the cost and return of Chinese taro production in the Hilo area. Return to management is estimated to be $5,575 per acre per crop. Total fixed costs and variable costs are $1,573 and $4,602 ...
  • DeFrank, Joseph; Easton-Smith, Virginia A; Leong, Gladys (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    A preliminary experiment with seven preemergence herbicides identified oxyfluorfen as a promising herbicide for commercial taro (Colocasia esculenta) production in Hawaii. Oxyfluorfen was applied twice at 0.38, 0.56 and ...
  • de la Pena, Ramon S (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    The production of new crop varieties through hybridization is the only stable method of crop improvement. As a program, crop improvement through breeding has been a major project of most research centers and institutes. ...
  • Santos, George (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Critical steps of growing a successful crop of dryland taro are discussed. The sequence of steps are pre-plant land preparation, planting, weed control, fertilization, pest control, and harvesting. This article will provide ...
  • Kahumoku, George Jr (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    A Native Hawaiian perspective on the origin of kalo (taro) and of taro cultivation in South Kona.
  • Lee, James (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Hawaii grown Chinese taro is in high demand in West Coast markets. Disease-free and year-round taro supply in addition to product identification are pre-requisites in establishing a market and meeting foreign competition. ...
  • Sato, Dwight; Silva, James; Kuniyoshi, James (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    This report summarizes the results of a single experiment in determining the phosphorus requirement for Chinese taro. Based upon the predicted results, 3,571 lbs treble superphosphate gave the highest no.1 and marketable ...
  • Foliaki, Sione; Sakai, William S; Tongatule, Sauni T; Tungata, Unlucky; Ka'ipo, Ron; Furutani, Sheldon C; Tsang, Marcel MC; Nielson, Gregory; Short, Richard (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Production of six cultivars of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don. in the Piihonua area near Hilo on the Island of Hawaii ranged from a high of over 70,000 pounds per production acre for the cultivar Tonga to a low of 14,000 ...
  • Sato, Dwight; Silva, James A (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Five plant spacing treatments and four fertilizer timing treatments were applied to Chinese taro grown for 9 months on land previously cropped to edible ginger. From our preliminary interpretation of the results, a 1 x 3 ...
  • Hollyer, James R; Sato, Dwight M (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Taro was, and continues to be, an important food for many people world-wide; at least 12.6 billion pounds of the genus Colocasia were consumed in 1987. In Hawaii, ancient lore states that one square mile of taro feed up ...
  • Silva, James A; Sato, Dwight; Leung, PingSun; Santos, George; Kuniyoshi, James (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    The response of Chinese Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott variety 'Bun Long') to 12 treatment combinations of nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) was determined on a crop grown for 9 months. Nitrogen had the greatest effect ...
  • Paull, Robert E; Coltman, Robert (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Objectives to study the relationships between physiological age of corms, storage capabilities, and final snack food chip quality of dryland taro are outlined. Background information is to be developed that will assist in ...
  • Ooka, Jeri J (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Although taro is susceptible to attack by at least twenty-three pathogens, only a few cause serious reduction in growth and production. Phytophthora blight (Phytophthora colocasiae) and Pythium root and corm rot (Pythium ...
  • Nip, Wai-Kit (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    Taro is a tropical root crop grown in Hawaii with a promising future. Now, the potential of taro has been under-estimated. This presentation reviews briefly (a) the cultural practices in Hawaii, (b) the availability of ...
  • Sato, Dwight; Beardsley, Jack; Hara, Arnold (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    The taro root aphid, Patchiella reaumuri, is one of the most destructive insect pests in dryland taro. Crop damage up to 75% has been known to occur with Chinese taro and up to 100% with dasheen. The taro root aphid is ...
  • Ching, Chauncey TK (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
  • Hollyer, James R (University of Hawaii, 1990-01)
    This paper describes world production of taros, and the marketing of taro corms and leaves in Hawaii and on North America. Suggestions for the improvement of taro marketing are also provided.

Now showing items 1-17 of 17

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