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dc.contributor.author McGrath, Barbara Burns en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-11-26T00:48:05Z en_US
dc.date.available 2009-11-26T00:48:05Z en_US
dc.date.issued 2002 en_US
dc.identifier.citation McGrath, B. B. 2002. Seattle Fa'a Samoa. The Contemporary Pacific 14 (2): 307-40. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1043-898X en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10125/13651 en_US
dc.description.abstract The paper reviews the concept of community as it has been used by social scientists to describe groups of people, and explores how it might be developed to understand the experience of diasporic communities. Although community avoids some of the essentializing tendencies that are inherent in the concept of culture, the classic use of community fails to acknowledge the reality of travel, and the transcultural, transnational movement of people and ideas. Four Samoan individuals who live in Seattle are portrayed using the method of “ethnography of the particular” to illustrate the cross-cutting influences of their lives and the fluid nature of the boundaries that surround their multiple communities. Shared values of the importance of family ties and church connections help to define what it means to be Samoan in Seattle. en_US
dc.language.iso en-US en_US
dc.publisher University of Hawai'i Press en_US
dc.publisher Center for Pacific Islands Studies en_US
dc.subject Samoa en_US
dc.subject diaspora en_US
dc.subject fa'a Samoa en_US
dc.subject culture en_US
dc.subject identity en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Oceania -- Periodicals. en_US
dc.title Seattle Fa'a Samoa en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.type.dcmi Text en_US

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