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Title: "What Kine Hawaiian Are You?" A Mo'olelo about Nationhood, Race, History, and the Contemporary Sovereignty Movement in Hawai'i 
Author: Osorio, Jonathan Kamakawiwo'ole
Date: 2001
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press
Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Citation: Osorio, J. K. 2001. "What Kine Hawaiian Are You?" A Mo'olelo about Nationhood, Race, History, and the Contemporary Sovereignty Movement in Hawai'i. Special issue, The Contemporary Pacific 13 (2): 359-79.
Abstract: In the summer of 1887 a small group of conspirators re p resenting about five hund
red mostly Caucasian residents and citizens of the Hawaiian Kingdom forced
King David Kal kaua to sign a new constitution of their own design that explicitly
humiliated him and the largely Native Hawaiian electorate. In the political
rallies that followed, Natives who supported the new constitution and who
exhorted Hawaiians to rally around it were ridiculed by opponents, who nevertheless
were often divided over whether to boycott the coming elections or to try
and take over the government through the vote and remove the most egregious
clauses from the constitution. As the recent reconciliation hearings in Hawai‘i
have demonstrated, the tension between participating in practical politics and
nurturing a defiant national spirit persists today and continues to afflict and
enliven the issues of nationhood and identity.
ISSN: 1043-898X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/13576
Keywords: cultural studies, decolonization, Hawaiian history, Hawaiian sovereignty, Pacific studies
LC Subject Headings: Oceania -- Periodicals.

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