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The New Tribe: Conflicts and Continuities in the Social Organization of Urban Maori

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Title: The New Tribe: Conflicts and Continuities in the Social Organization of Urban Maori
Authors: Maaka, Roger C.A.
LC Subject Headings: Oceania -- Periodicals.
Issue Date: 1994
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press
Center for Pacific Islands Studies
Citation: Maaka, R. C. A. 1994. The New Tribe: Conflicts and Continuities in the Social Organization of Urban Maori. The Contemporary Pacific 6 (2): 311-36.
Abstract: This study is about the formal retribalization of a group of urban Maori against a
changing political backdrop. In 1987 Ngati Kahungunu people living in Christchurch
formalized their kinship links with the intent of maintaining tribal identity
in a metropolitan setting, strengthening ties to the tribal homeland, and providing
a mutual support network. Urbanization is not the only factor; this event is also
an example of a tribal group attempting to establish themselves corporately in
another tribe's territory. Although this local development took place independently,
it became part of a nationwide move to enable tribal organizations to
deliver government-funded programs and reestablish sovereignty over tribal territories
and assets. The paradox in this development lies in reclaiming sovereignty
on the one hand and establishing socially active tribal satellites in another tribe's
territory on the other. This paradox is often glossed over and ignored by both
government and tribal leaders. I question whether the tribal satellites can survive
as communal groups outside their home territories given the current development
of the top-down processes of government policies and the elitist formulations of
tribal structure and identity.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/12988
ISSN: 1043-898X
Appears in Collections:TCP [The Contemporary Pacific], 1994 - Volume 6, Number 2



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