Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101834

A group randomized trial to examine the feasibility and effects of pedometer use and self-monitoring of daily walking in people with severe and persistent mental illnesses

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Item Summary

Title: A group randomized trial to examine the feasibility and effects of pedometer use and self-monitoring of daily walking in people with severe and persistent mental illnesses
Authors: Chao, Puihan Joyce
Keywords: pedometer
severe and persistent mental illnesses
SPMI
Issue Date: Dec 2010
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [December 2010]
Abstract: This randomized controlled pretest-posttest group comparison study aimed 1) to systematically examine the feasibility and acceptability of pedometer use and selfmonitoring of daily steps, 2) to empirically evaluate the potential reactivity effects associated with pedometer use and self-monitoring of walking, and 3) to investigate the potential short-term treatment effects of pedometer use on health outcomes in people with severe and persistent mental illnesses (SPMI). Sixty participants (mean age 46.8, 67% men, 83.3% unemployed) were recruited from a Clubhouse and Community Mental Health Centers in Hawaii. The large majority of participants had a primary DSM-IV diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder, Recurrent (45%), followed by Bipolar Disorder (30%) and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder (21.7%). After a pretest assessment, participants were randomly assigned to either unsealed pedometer with self-monitoring (n=20), sealed pedometer without self-monitoring (n=20), or control no pedometer group (n=20), and were asked to return for posttest assessment after two weeks. Pedometer users (n=40) also completed a Debriefing Survey to systematically examine their pedometer use experience. Results showed that (1) pedometer use and self-monitoring of daily steps procedures were feasible for, and regarded as acceptable and useful by, participants with SPMI living in rural areas and a subtropical climate; (2) there was no significant reactivity effect associated with pedometer feedback and self-monitoring of walking for two weeks; and 3) there were no significant treatment effects of pedometer use on promoting physical activity and health outcomes in short-term pedometer use for people with SPMI. With increasing affordability, functionality, accuracy, and acceptability of a pedometer as an assessment and motivational device for promoting physical activity, its potential utility for people with SPMI should not be ignored, particularly given the good adherence and perceived utility of pedometer use found in this study. Future studies may continue to explore specific mechanisms that can account for and enhance the success of initiation and maintenance of pedometer-assisted selfintervention for people with SPMI.
Description: Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2010.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101834
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Psychology



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