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Ecological restoration of native plant communities in a Hawaiian tropical dry ecosystem dominated by the invasive grass Urochloa maxima

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Item Summary

Title: Ecological restoration of native plant communities in a Hawaiian tropical dry ecosystem dominated by the invasive grass Urochloa maxima
Authors: Ammondt, Selita Aurora Elisabet
Keywords: restoration
ecology
invasive species
tropical ecosystem
Issue Date: Dec 2010
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [December 2010]
Abstract: In Hawai„i, nonnative grass invasions are a primary cause of tropical dry forest loss. In this study, methods for restoring native dry forest communities currently dominated by the invasive grass Urochloa maxima were explored. The garden study objective was to quantify the importance of native functional diversity for suppressing U. maxima. Increasing native functional diversity impacted U. maxima biomass (p<0.001) and decreased reproduction (p=0.05). The field study was designed to quantify the impact of invasive grass control and native species additions for ecological restoration. Survival of native species outplants ranged from 38-67%. Cover of U. maxima did not differ across outplant treatments (p>0.10), but was higher without native additions (p≤0.025). Broadcast seeding was not effective. Results indicate potential for restoring native dry ecosystems in Hawai„i currently dominated by U. maxima. Recommendations for restoration include using competitive native species with high functional diversity, outplanting seedlings, and initial and post-planting grass control.
Description: M.S. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2010.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101761
Appears in Collections:M.S. - Natural Resources and Environmental Managament



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