Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101733

A conceptual framework for best practices in information literacy instruction based on stakeholders' perceptions : a case study of four Vietnamese academic libraries

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Item Summary

Title: A conceptual framework for best practices in information literacy instruction based on stakeholders' perceptions : a case study of four Vietnamese academic libraries
Authors: Diep, Chi Kim
Keywords: information literacy
Issue Date: May 2011
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2011]
Abstract: This case study explored the perceptions of stakeholders about the development and delivery of information literacy instruction (ILI) to students at four universities, identified perceived challenges of including IL as a credit course in the curriculum, and resulted in a conceptual framework of best practices based on the findings. Constructs from change theory, learning theory, leadership theory and collaboration theory served as lenses to interpret the results.
The findings showed that IL is primarily a concern of librarians and has not yet had an impact on Vietnamese campus culture. IL activities at these four university libraries mostly take the form of lectures, workshops, and modules on basic IL skills designed and delivered by instruction librarians, and attended at the discretion of students. Few ILI activities are subject discipline-related and target the information needs of students in a particular area. Assessment has been formative and provides minimal feedback to students and instruction librarians. Respondents reported challenges of including ILI as a credit course in the curriculum, including the impact of the credit system, the lasting impact of teacher-centered instruction and rote learning, misperceptions of stakeholders about the effect of IL on student learning outcomes (SLO), degree of support of academic stakeholders, degree of faculty-librarian collaboration, and scarcity of resources. The study provides ample evidence that all stakeholder groups recognize the value of ILI and support progress in the area. IL practitioners and researchers argue that instruction librarians and library administrators should be leaders in IL initiatives, and act as change agents through disseminating the mission and values of IL to the campus community.
Description: Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2011.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101733
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Communication and Information Sciences



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