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Claiming the colonial and domesticating the foreign : a Native Hawaiian aesthetic for the piano in hula ku'i music

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Item Summary

Title: Claiming the colonial and domesticating the foreign : a Native Hawaiian aesthetic for the piano in hula ku'i music
Authors: Sala, Aaron Joseph
Keywords: piano
Issue Date: May 2011
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2011]
Abstract: This thesis explores the nature of piano performance practice in Hawaiian hula ku'i music. As an auxiliary instrument, the piano serves as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic decoration to what has become the core Hawaiian ensemble. Its performance is informed by an aesthetic system grounded in Hawaiian culture. The methodology by which piano performances were transcribed has led to the discovery of an analytical technique that is new to the field of ethnomusicology. In conjunction with notation software, MIDI technology provides a complex musical score which also serves as a hyper-descriptive kinetic map, allowing the examination of not only the music itself but also the kinetic behavior of the pianist at the keyboard. Finally, by negotiating a Native voice for ethnomusicology, shifting the focus from a purely ethnographic approach toward one that acknowledges the Native practitioner/scholar, this thesis argues for a common ground between Academic ontology and Native epistemology.
Description: M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2011.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101687
Appears in Collections:M.A. - Music



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