Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101642

Innovation attributes, workplace climate, and organizational facilitators as predictors of integrated dual disorders treatment implementation

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Item Summary

Title: Innovation attributes, workplace climate, and organizational facilitators as predictors of integrated dual disorders treatment implementation
Authors: Wilson, Diane Christine
Keywords: evidence-based practices
Issue Date: Aug 2011
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [August 2011]
Abstract: Despite an extensive body of evidence supporting the effectiveness of specific mental health and substance disorder treatments, evidence-based practices (EBPs) remain sparse in routine clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to identify modifiable practitioner level variables that predict implementation of a specific EBP, integrated dual disorders treatment (IDDT). A prospective correlational design was used to assess the degree to which practitioners‟ views about innovation attributes, workplace climate, and organizational facilitators predict IDDT implementation beyond practitioner characteristics, including training and experience. Participants were 115 practitioners in the state of Hawaii who had received training in IDDT. Standard regression analyses showed that innovation attributes (a composite of relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, observability, voluntariness, and image) predicted scores on implementation measures of general IDDT interventions and motivational interviewing. Workplace climate and organizational facilitators did not predict implementation. Attention to innovation attributes in the development, packaging, and dissemination of EBPs may enhance implementation, ultimately improving service quality and outcomes.
Description: Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2011.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101642
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Psychology



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