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Investigating ethnic identity, acculturation, self-esteem, trait anxiety, and depressive symptomatology across biracial Asian-White and monoracial Asian American and White American individuals

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Item Summary

Title: Investigating ethnic identity, acculturation, self-esteem, trait anxiety, and depressive symptomatology across biracial Asian-White and monoracial Asian American and White American individuals
Authors: Subica, Andrew Makoto
Keywords: biracial
Issue Date: Dec 2011
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [December 2011]
Abstract: This exploratory study examined Asian American and White American ethnic identity, White American-Asian acculturation, self-esteem, trait anxiety, and depressive symptomatology differences and correlations among biracial Asian-White American, Asian American and White American individuals. Biracial Asian-White American within-group differences on these variables based on type of biracial Asian-White American identity claimed were also examined. Participants were University of Hawaii at Mānoa college students (N=367) recruited from their college courses; they completed the 10-measure battery in exchange for course extra credit. Exploratory statistical analyses included ANOVA, Pearson‟s correlation, and linear regression.
Asian American and White American participants reported higher levels of Asian American and White American ethnic identity, respectively, than biracial Asian-White American participants. Biracial Asian-White American participants reported greater acculturation to White American culture than Asian American participants. Asian American participants reported the lowest levels of self-esteem and depressive symptomatology of all racial groups. Asian American ethnic identity and White American-Asian acculturation were correlated among the biracial Asian-White American and Asian American participants while self-esteem, trait anxiety, and depressive symptomatology were moderately correlated among all three racial groups. Excluding one relationship, Asian American and White American ethnic identity did not correlate with self-esteem, trait anxiety or depressive symptomatology. As predicted, biracial Asian-White American participants who integrated both racial backgrounds into their self-identity did not differ from biracial Asian-White American participants who favored one racial background over the other in regards to Asian American and White American ethnic identity, White American-Asian acculturation, self-esteem, trait anxiety, and depressive symptomatology. Contributions to the biracial literature, limitations along with clinical implications of the study's findings and future research directions are discussed.
Description: Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2011.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101494
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Psychology



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