Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101474

Increased power, pulse length, and spectral purity free-electron laser for inverse-compton x-ray production and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of thin film photovoltaics

File Description SizeFormat 
Kowalczyk_Jeremy_r.pdfVersion for non-UH users. Copying/Printing is not permitted13.3 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Kowalczyk_Jeremy_uh.pdfVersion for UH users13.45 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Item Summary

Title: Increased power, pulse length, and spectral purity free-electron laser for inverse-compton x-ray production and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of thin film photovoltaics
Authors: Kowalczyk, Jeremy Michael
Issue Date: Dec 2011
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [December 2011]
Abstract: The free-electron laser (FEL) system can be configured to produce X-ray or extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light via Compton backscattering and to perform many types of spectroscopy including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). In it's most common incarnation, the FEL is limited by three major factors: average laser power, laser spectral purity, and laser pulse length. Some examples of the limitations that these shortcomings give rise to include limiting the range of remote spectroscopy, degrading spectroscopic precision, and lowering the attainable x-ray ux, respectively.
In this work, we explored three methods of improving the FEL. First, a beam expanding optic dubbed the TIRBBE was designed, built, and tested to prevent laser damage to the resonator mirrors and allow for higher average power. This optic had the added benefit of increasing the spectral purity. Second, a intra-cavity etalon filter dubbed the FROZEN FISH was designed, built, and tested to increase spectral purity and eliminate the frequency pulling (tendency of an FEL to pull towards longer wavelengths during a macropulse) all in a high damage threshold, fully wavelength adjustable package. Finally, a laser cooling scheme which allows for extension of the electron beam macropulse used to create the FEL light by counter-acting electron back-heating was explored. The first measurements of the back-heating temperature rise were taken, calculations of the required laser parameters were made, design of the full system was completed, and construction has begun.
Experimental work using LIBS to characterize thin film solar cells was also completed in anticipation of using the improved FEL to better characterize such materials. The frequency tunability and picosecond micropulse width of the FEL will allow for exploration of the frequency response of LIBS ablation and fine resolution of the make up of these materials
Description: Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2011.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/101474
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Physics



Items in ScholarSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.