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Effect of variety and cooking method on resistant starch content of white rice and subsequent postprandial glucose response and appetite in humans

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Item Summary

Title: Effect of variety and cooking method on resistant starch content of white rice and subsequent postprandial glucose response and appetite in humans
Authors: Chiu, Yu-Ting
Keywords: white rice
postprandial glucose response
Issue Date: Dec 2012
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [December 2012]
Abstract: Rice is a staple carbohydrate throughout the world. Previous work has indicated that the resistant starch (RS) content of rice consumed in India varied with rice variety and cooking method. This study quantified RS in four white rice varieties (jasmine, long grain, medium grain, and short grain) cooked in three manners (baked, conventional rice cooker, and pressure cooker). The rice varieties with the highest and lowest RS content were selected for a pilot-scale trial to characterize postprandial glycemic response and appetite ratings in healthy adults (n = 21). The results showed refrigerated long-grain rice cooked in a conventional rice cooker had the highest RS content (HRS, 2.55 g RS 100 g-1) and refrigerated short-grain rice cooked in a pressure cooker had the lowest RS content (LRS, 0.201 g RS 100 g-1). The areas under the curves for glycemic response were significantly lower with HRS and LRS than with glucose beverage; however, there was no difference between HRS and LRS. Glycemic indices did not differ significantly between HRS and LRS. Subjects reported an overall increased feeling of fullness and decreased desire to eat based on the incremental area under the curve for both HRS and LRS compared to control. In conclusion, we found that RS naturally occurring in rice had minimal impact on postprandial glycemic response and appetite.
Description: M.S. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2012.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/100907
Appears in Collections:M.S. - Nutritional Sciences



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