Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/100606

Identifying predictors of weight gain : the role of body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, living conditions and physical activity

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Item Summary

Title: Identifying predictors of weight gain : the role of body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, living conditions and physical activity
Authors: Kelly, Mackenzie Christine
Keywords: obesity
Issue Date: Aug 2013
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [August 2013]
Abstract: Background: The prevalence of obesity increases as women move from adolescence to young adulthood, yet the factors that contribute to weight gain in this population are largely unknown. Studies of weight gain in college populations have revealed that significant, variable weight change occurs in as few as eight weeks, but have been limited in their ability to identify potential risk factors for weight gain. Dietary restraint, living conditions, and physical activity have been explored as potential indicators of weight change in college populations with mixed results; however, body dissatisfaction has yet to be investigated as a risk factor.
Objectives: To identify the factors that predict weight change and differentiate individuals who gain weight from those who lose or maintain weight over a one-year period.
Methods: Undergraduate college women (N=131) completed measures of body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, living conditions, and physical activity at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. Height, weight, and body composition were be collected at all assessment periods.
Results: 44% of participants gained at least three pounds, 23% lost at least three pounds, and 33% maintained weight over one year. Weight change was associated with changes in body fat and was not related to baseline age or BMI. Baseline body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, physical activity, and living conditions did not predict weight change at one year, nor did they differentiate between individuals in the three weight change categories. Further research is needed to identify the factors associated with weight gain in young adult women.
Description: M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2013.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/100606
Appears in Collections:M.A. - Psychology



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