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Personality types and criminal interrogations : examining interrogation strategies and false admissions

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Item Summary

Title: Personality types and criminal interrogations : examining interrogation strategies and false admissions
Authors: Warner, Mark Stephen
Keywords: false confessions
interrogation strategies
Issue Date: Aug 2014
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [August 2014]
Abstract: This study investigated the relationship between interrogation strategies, personality types and the likelihood that a false confession might occur. The usage of minimization and maximization tactics in interrogations by investigators was explained; as was how investigators might choose one interrogation tactic over another based on a suspect's dominant personality type. Specifically, introversion and extraversion were considered most relevant. The study utilized 103 subjects reading a hypothetical interrogation scenario involving a make-up exam and rated the likelihood that they would confess to the accusation of sharing answers with a classmate. Results showed that minimization strategies led to a significant higher likelihood that participants would falsely admit to sharing answers than would maximization strategies. Implications and limitations of the results are discussed.
Description: M.A. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2014.
Includes bibliographical references.
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:M.A. - Communicology

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