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Respiratory effort harvesting via torso movement for a wearable biosensor

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Item Summary

Title: Respiratory effort harvesting via torso movement for a wearable biosensor
Authors: Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh
Keywords: Biosensor
Human Energy Harvesting
Respiratory Effort
Torso movement
Issue Date: May 2014
Publisher: [Honolulu] : [University of Hawaii at Manoa], [May 2014]
Abstract: Respiratory activity can be a clinical predictor for serious adverse events, yet accurate observation of respiration is infrequently performed because of the obtrusiveness and inconvenience of the existing methods. Wearable health monitoring is a convenient and promising way of collecting physiological data including respiratory activity information. However, one of the major obstacles to widespread adoption of such systems is their dependence on limited lifetime batteries as their power source. Consequently, methods for scavenging renewable energy especially human energy have been investigated. The movements of the chest wall and abdominal area during normal breathing can be a source of renewable energy that is not only readily available but also carries critical medical information. In this dissertation, as the first reported practical and human-tested study, novel models and methods are investigated to practically estimate the available energy during breathing. Then a wearable lightweight respiratory effort harvesting sensor is implemented, optimized, and tested. The results from our method show tremendously lower amounts than what was theoretically estimated in previous literature.
Our self-powered respiration sensor is also the first reported non-invasive, human tested sensor which is able to produce mW-range power and can sense thoracic vs. abdominal movements. The output is sufficient to continuously power an ultra-low power System-on-Chip (SoC) in standby condition. Energy accumulation for less than 1 minute while seated and less than 3 seconds during brisk walking provides enough power for a power-optimized on-body SoC. The electromagnetic harvesting system produces up to 1.4V, 6.44mW and 30.4mJ which can power up the SoC for transmission every 6 minutes during fast walking.
A statistical paired t-test analysis of the calculated energy expenditure confirmed that there is no significant change (P>0.05) in the metabolic rate of subjects wearing the electromagnetic harvester and biosensor.
A statistical paired t-test analysis of the calculated energy expenditure confirmed that there is no significant change (P>0.05) in the metabolic rate of subjects wearing the electromagnetic harvester and biosensor.
Description: Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa 2014.
Includes bibliographical references.
URI/DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/10125/100481
Rights: All UHM dissertations and theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission from the copyright owner.
Appears in Collections:Ph.D. - Electrical Engineering



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